https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chipset#/media/File:Pentium_E2220_with_Intel_i945GC_Chipset.jpg

Robert Gaskin’s poem “HAIKU ARE LIKE TROLLIES”: 

Wandering in mist

Reaching out to soft sunlight 

Blue-scaled dragons pause.

Moon low over sea

Glimpse of discarded cocoon 

Small fish swimming idly. 

Prehistoric Digital Poetry an Archaeology of Forms, by Chris T. Funkhouser, The University of Alabama Press, 2007, pp. 58–59.

John Morris’s poem “Haiku—At Random”:

Frogling, listen, waters 

Insatiable, listen,

The still, scarecrow dusk. 

Listen: I dreamed, was slain. 

Up, battles! Echo these dusk 

Battles! Glittering . 

Fleas spring far, scarecrow,

Oh scarecrow, scarecrow: well, far, 

Scarecrow, oh scarecrow. 

“Prehistoric Digital Poetry an Archaeology of Forms.” Prehistoric Digital Poetry an Archaeology of Forms, by Chris T. Funkhouser, The University of Alabama Press, 2007, pp. 58–59.

The poems above were “written” by programmers who put together software programs with a set of mathematically-based language rules. The programs were run and the poems above were the end result.

Computer programmers and poets do not have much in common and there is usually little overlap between them. But in this case the programmers have pushed into to an area that doesn’t “revolve around [them]selves” – poetry. New developments like the poems above are not possible unless individuals push boundaries.


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